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The Harder Courage (historical tragedy)

“This is a true event that happened right here in Cowlitz County; though the concept of a developed friendship between the two men and most of the dialogue come from the accomplished and talented story-telling of Leslie Krausch Slape.”

— Cowlitz County Sheriff Mark Nelson, on Facebook, about the 2013 staged reading

“The dialogue by Slape is rich and the strongest part of the show. She has a great ear for it and her characters come alive for us because of it.”

 —Dennis Sparks, reviewer, at the 2013 staged reading

“I really liked much of the dialogue and felt it allowed us into the psyche and emotions of the convicted man. … It will be interesting to see the final version of this play staged in full production. I believe this could be a most interesting and gripping work.”

  —Gregory E. Zschomler, reviewer, at the 2013 staged reading

“I thought it was a beautiful, beautiful story, and everyone who read it just raved about it.”

— James Pagliasotti, president of the Ashland New Plays Festival’s board of directors, which selected The Harder Courage as a 2018 finalist.

“Two very skilled actors, Michael Gabriel Goodfriend and Jon Toppo, performed the recording and at the end they were too emotionally exhausted to say anything but, ‘Wow.’ “

— James Pagliasotti (again), in a Facebook post, 2022, referring to the 2018 Play4Keeps podcast

The Tale-Teller (short story)

“The first story in the Family volume really caught my attention. It was submitted by Leslie Slape and is an outstanding example of the wisdom and inspiration created by these stories. It is called “The Tale Teller” and is about a traveling storyteller and the healing power fo story. This is a powerful story for anyone’s repertoire. I plan to learn it right away.” — Linda Spitzer in a review of The Healing Heart books published in winter 2004 in Story Times magazine

“Healing through story” begins with a beautiful story about storytelling using stones as a symbol to demonstrate their concreteness and tangibility of the spoken word.” — Erin E. Baird, in a review of The Healing Heart: Families published in spring 2007 in American Communication Journal

I find this story so healing and so telling about attachment and nurturance that it becomes a great story for therapists to understand.” — Sherry Reiter, PhD, LCSW

The Toy Piano (oral story, originally published as a newspaper column)

Leslie Slape’s June 7 column of her days as a young girl in the desert near Ritzville, Wash., was an example of written expression at its finest. It is truly masterful writing. … She draws from the rich memories of her childhood. She deserves my applause and admiration for this outstanding piece of artistic literature.” — Allan Wise, Kalama

Saved by a Bullet (award-winning newspaper story)

In 2003, when I interviewed a man in jail who had been shot and almost killed after burglarizing a home, He told me he was going to turn his life around. In 2007 I decided to find out if he kept his promise to himself. What I learned surprised me.

The Storyteller’s Trance in the ‘The Turn of the Screw’ (scholarly paper)

“Her final paper, a rereading of Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw through the lens of storytelling conventions, employed her own background as a professional storyteller to make startlingly original and powerful observations about the structure of James’s novella. It is rare for an undergraduate paper – particularly an undergraduate paper written at the tail end of a very demanding term – to make true contributions to the scholarly literature surrounding a text, but Leslie’s did just that.”            —Professor Sarah Ensor, Portland State University

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